The Klusterfug Chronicles

Chronicling the klusterfug of information on the interweb.

Mar 26

superseventies:

Melanie Safka — Lay Down - 1970 TV appearance


kristenmerieandacupoftea:

Latch ft. Sam Smith | Disclosure


Mar 16

Mar 1
The Donkey Show.  (at Oberon)

The Donkey Show. (at Oberon)


Feb 13
theatlantic:

The Narcissistic Injury of Middle Age

“I feel invisible.”
I often hear variations on that statement from people who are middle-aged or older, especially women. As our bodies age and younger people find us less physically attractive, they seem to look right through us, as if we no longer exist. Finding that we have lost our sexual currency can come as a blow to our self-esteem, even for those of us who haven’t relied heavily on our looks to garner attention. Most people enjoy being noticed and found attractive. Hardly anyone wants to feel as if they don’t exist.
As we begin to develop a sense of self during the earliest months of life, being “seen” by our caretakers plays a central role. The joy we perceive in our parents’ gaze makes us feel that we are beautiful and important, an experience that lays the foundation for healthy self-esteem. Even as adults, we depend to a significant degree on being noticed and admired to maintain our sense of self. This isn’t merely narcissism in the unhealthy sense of the word. Human beings are social animals, defining ourselves through interconnection: Although we build self-esteem by living up to our own personal values and standards, we also rely upon the regard of others to feel good about ourselves.
Read more. [Image: Phenomenal Fauna/Library of Congress]

theatlantic:

The Narcissistic Injury of Middle Age

“I feel invisible.”

I often hear variations on that statement from people who are middle-aged or older, especially women. As our bodies age and younger people find us less physically attractive, they seem to look right through us, as if we no longer exist. Finding that we have lost our sexual currency can come as a blow to our self-esteem, even for those of us who haven’t relied heavily on our looks to garner attention. Most people enjoy being noticed and found attractive. Hardly anyone wants to feel as if they don’t exist.

As we begin to develop a sense of self during the earliest months of life, being “seen” by our caretakers plays a central role. The joy we perceive in our parents’ gaze makes us feel that we are beautiful and important, an experience that lays the foundation for healthy self-esteem. Even as adults, we depend to a significant degree on being noticed and admired to maintain our sense of self. This isn’t merely narcissism in the unhealthy sense of the word. Human beings are social animals, defining ourselves through interconnection: Although we build self-esteem by living up to our own personal values and standards, we also rely upon the regard of others to feel good about ourselves.

Read more. [Image: Phenomenal Fauna/Library of Congress]



Feb 12
theatlantic:

Indisputable Evidence That Millennials Have It Worse Than Any Generation in 50 Years

Every generation likes to believe that it came of age at an especially trying moment in history. Millennials have the Great Recession to lament. Gen X had the dotcom bust. The Boomers had Vietnam. And the Silents had the early Cold War, complete with the not-so-silly threat of nuclear war. 
But at least when it comes to the job market, I think we can all agree by now that today’s young adults are deserving of at least a few extra pity points. And should there be any doubt, here’s a wonderful, one-chart demonstration of why from a new Pew report. At every education level, the 25- to 32-year-olds of 2013 confronted a higher unemployment rate than past generations did when they were stepping into the workforce. And keep in mind, that’s 2013—four years after the economy was supposed to have started mending.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Indisputable Evidence That Millennials Have It Worse Than Any Generation in 50 Years

Every generation likes to believe that it came of age at an especially trying moment in history. Millennials have the Great Recession to lament. Gen X had the dotcom bust. The Boomers had Vietnam. And the Silents had the early Cold War, complete with the not-so-silly threat of nuclear war. 

But at least when it comes to the job market, I think we can all agree by now that today’s young adults are deserving of at least a few extra pity points. And should there be any doubt, here’s a wonderful, one-chart demonstration of why from a new Pew report. At every education level, the 25- to 32-year-olds of 2013 confronted a higher unemployment rate than past generations did when they were stepping into the workforce. And keep in mind, that’s 2013—four years after the economy was supposed to have started mending.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

(via npr)


“To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour.”
Auguries of Innocence, William Blake (via mycolorbook)

(via teachingliteracy)


Feb 11

amnhnyc:

New research provides insight to the population distribution and “lost years” of Central Pacific green turtles, the span of time when the turtles hatch, enter the water, and emerge on a feeding ground often hundreds of miles away.
The study indicates that instead of simply drifting with ocean currents until they reach a landmass, young sea turtles may actively swim to reach specific feeding grounds.
Read the full story.


Im in my green sea turtle period: the lost years.

amnhnyc:

New research provides insight to the population distribution and “lost years” of Central Pacific green turtles, the span of time when the turtles hatch, enter the water, and emerge on a feeding ground often hundreds of miles away.

The study indicates that instead of simply drifting with ocean currents until they reach a landmass, young sea turtles may actively swim to reach specific feeding grounds.

Read the full story.

Im in my green sea turtle period: the lost years.

(via npr)


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