The Klusterfug Chronicles

Chronicling the klusterfug of information on the interweb.

Jun 10
nprfreshair:

Cult film director John Waters decided to hitchhike across the country and then write a book about it. That book is called Carsick, and he joins Fresh Air to share some of his stories. In the interview he and Terry talk about what makes a good [and bad] hitchhiking sign, creepy highway motels, and the etiquette of turning down rides:

"In real life when you’re out there, as I said — I would’ve gotten in [with] Ted Bundy in his Volkswagen with his arm in his sling, in the front seat. You’ll get in any car, believe me. All your rules, all your things that you imagine, go out the window when you’ve been standing there for 10 years and those Kansas winds are ripping your weather-beaten face.
It is the worst beauty regimen ever to hitchhike. I would go in the motels at night and look in the mirror. And I have in my office a little mirror, a hand mirror that I got from a joke shop where you pick it up and look at yourself and it screams. Well, that’s what every mirror did when I hitchhiked across America. It let out a shriek of horror when they saw [my] hitchhiking face — a new thing that I want to invent a product for.” 


Photo by Sauta Marsh 

nprfreshair:

Cult film director John Waters decided to hitchhike across the country and then write a book about it. That book is called Carsick, and he joins Fresh Air to share some of his stories. In the interview he and Terry talk about what makes a good [and bad] hitchhiking sign, creepy highway motels, and the etiquette of turning down rides:

"In real life when you’re out there, as I said — I would’ve gotten in [with] Ted Bundy in his Volkswagen with his arm in his sling, in the front seat. You’ll get in any car, believe me. All your rules, all your things that you imagine, go out the window when you’ve been standing there for 10 years and those Kansas winds are ripping your weather-beaten face.

It is the worst beauty regimen ever to hitchhike. I would go in the motels at night and look in the mirror. And I have in my office a little mirror, a hand mirror that I got from a joke shop where you pick it up and look at yourself and it screams. Well, that’s what every mirror did when I hitchhiked across America. It let out a shriek of horror when they saw [my] hitchhiking face — a new thing that I want to invent a product for.” 

Photo by Sauta Marsh 


pulitzercenter:

It’s 8 o’clock on a crisp Greenland evening. The air tastes like a fresh bubbling spring, the result of the steady gusts of wind blowing over the nearby glacier, my guide explains. A puff of diesel pollutes my senses as we bounce our way over this jagged landscape of rock and ice on an ATV. The small hunting village of Ittoqqortoormiit is on Greenland’s northeast coast. The 477 Inuits who call this territory home live in isolation and relative peace. But today we’re on the look-out for an unlikely predator.
"They come very early in the morning and very late at night," my guide Erling Madsen shouts over the engine and the waves of Walrus Bay crashing against a 50-foot cliff two feet from where our wheels grind earth. We’re heading to where that predator was first spotted. "A hunter called me. He saw it heading into town," Madsen said, his rifle strapped to my back as I hold on tightly to his shoulders.
Ittoqqortoormiit is one of the most remote villages in the Western Hemisphere. Not a single road connects the community to the rest of the world. Only a bumpy helicopter ride in and out once a week takes visitors to a world where seal fur and musk ox meat are popular forms of currency. Global trends have filtered through over the years, but usually after the rest of the world has moved on. Justin Bieber’s “Baby” is a current favorite among the village’s small teen population.
When it comes to climate change, however, there is a new world order and Ittoqqortoormiit is on the frontlines. Earlier this year scientists reported that the U.S. climate has changed as a result of global warming. “Summers are longer and hotter… Winters are generally shorter and warmer,” the report explained. This is old news to a town that straddles Greenland’s ice sheet—or what scientists call ground zero for climate change.
"We have a front row seat," said Madsen as we disembarked from our ATV. Madsen used to be the mayor of this northeastern territory, but today he acts like a sheriff. "Those are his tracks," he says pointing to depressions in the ground. The threat? Polar bears.

Read the rest of the story and view Pulitzer Center grantee Jonathan Vigliotti’s project: As Greenland’s Ice Melts, Polar Bears Turn on Humans

pulitzercenter:

It’s 8 o’clock on a crisp Greenland evening. The air tastes like a fresh bubbling spring, the result of the steady gusts of wind blowing over the nearby glacier, my guide explains. A puff of diesel pollutes my senses as we bounce our way over this jagged landscape of rock and ice on an ATV. The small hunting village of Ittoqqortoormiit is on Greenland’s northeast coast. The 477 Inuits who call this territory home live in isolation and relative peace. But today we’re on the look-out for an unlikely predator.

"They come very early in the morning and very late at night," my guide Erling Madsen shouts over the engine and the waves of Walrus Bay crashing against a 50-foot cliff two feet from where our wheels grind earth. We’re heading to where that predator was first spotted. "A hunter called me. He saw it heading into town," Madsen said, his rifle strapped to my back as I hold on tightly to his shoulders.

Ittoqqortoormiit is one of the most remote villages in the Western Hemisphere. Not a single road connects the community to the rest of the world. Only a bumpy helicopter ride in and out once a week takes visitors to a world where seal fur and musk ox meat are popular forms of currency. Global trends have filtered through over the years, but usually after the rest of the world has moved on. Justin Bieber’s “Baby” is a current favorite among the village’s small teen population.

When it comes to climate change, however, there is a new world order and Ittoqqortoormiit is on the frontlines. Earlier this year scientists reported that the U.S. climate has changed as a result of global warming. “Summers are longer and hotter… Winters are generally shorter and warmer,” the report explained. This is old news to a town that straddles Greenland’s ice sheet—or what scientists call ground zero for climate change.

"We have a front row seat," said Madsen as we disembarked from our ATV. Madsen used to be the mayor of this northeastern territory, but today he acts like a sheriff. "Those are his tracks," he says pointing to depressions in the ground. The threat? Polar bears.

Read the rest of the story and view Pulitzer Center grantee Jonathan Vigliotti’s project: As Greenland’s Ice Melts, Polar Bears Turn on Humans


“Wherever you stand, be the soul of that place.” Rumi (via creatingaquietmind)

(via teachingliteracy)


judygarlandgifs:

Happy Birthday Judy Garland!
(June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969)

She was the most loyal person and the greatest entertainer in the world. And the first thing you think of is the great warmth of Judy, the great, giving, little person that she was. Her heart was bigger than all of her put together. She was just one big heart.

-June Allyson

(via suicideblonde)


Jun 8
rookiemag:

Friday Playlist: Get Ready

Pre-party jams. By Amy Rose. Illustration by Minna.

rookiemag:

Friday Playlist: Get Ready

Pre-party jams. By Amy Rose. Illustration by Minna.


May 17
theparisreview:

“What is it about Antrim? He writes as if prose were his native language: his sentences have the matter-of-fact pathos and absurdity of dreams.”
Read more of this week’s staff picks, including Donald Antrim’s new collection, Kara Walker’s Domino Sugar Factory installation, and Knausgaard’s unquotability.

theparisreview:

“What is it about Antrim? He writes as if prose were his native language: his sentences have the matter-of-fact pathos and absurdity of dreams.”

Read more of this week’s staff picks, including Donald Antrim’s new collection, Kara Walker’s Domino Sugar Factory installation, and Knausgaard’s unquotability.


“Sure, successful people work a bit on weekends, but they know that weekends are mostly about giving the brain a break. Even if you’re not religious, challenge yourself to keep a Sabbath of sorts: one 24-hour period where you don’t do any of your usual work. You may find yourself so relaxed you’ll look forward to Monday.” Your Weekend Has 60 Hours—Here’s How To Wring The Most Out Of Them (via fastcompany)

(via teachingliteracy)


May 12
theatlantic:

The Not-So-Distant Future Where We Can All Upgrade Our Brains

In a decade, cognitive enhancement may have gone mainstream. Pills can already help you stay up longer, bring more focus to your work, and who knows what else. But what might sound good on an individual level could create societal disruptions, or so Palo Alto think-tank the Institute for the Future proposes in its latest Ten-Year Forecasts. 
As a result, the Institute has proposed that the world’s citizens need a “Magna Cortica.” 
"Magna Cortica is the argument that we need to have a guidebook for both the design spec and ethical rules around the increasing power and diversity of cognitive augmentation," said IFTF distinguished fellow, Jamais Cascio. "There are a lot of pharmaceutical and digital tools that have been able to boost our ability to think. Adderall, Provigil, and extra-cortical technologies."
Back in 2008, 20 percent of scientists reported using brain-enhancing drugs. And I spoke with dozens of readers who had complex regimens, including, for example, a researcher at the MIT-affiliated Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. “We aren’t the teen clubbers popping uppers to get through a hard day running a cash register after binge drinking,” the researcher told me. “We are responsible humans.” Responsible humans trying to get an edge in incredibly competitive and cognitively demanding fields. 
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

The Not-So-Distant Future Where We Can All Upgrade Our Brains

In a decade, cognitive enhancement may have gone mainstream. Pills can already help you stay up longer, bring more focus to your work, and who knows what else. But what might sound good on an individual level could create societal disruptions, or so Palo Alto think-tank the Institute for the Future proposes in its latest Ten-Year Forecasts. 

As a result, the Institute has proposed that the world’s citizens need a “Magna Cortica.” 

"Magna Cortica is the argument that we need to have a guidebook for both the design spec and ethical rules around the increasing power and diversity of cognitive augmentation," said IFTF distinguished fellow, Jamais Cascio. "There are a lot of pharmaceutical and digital tools that have been able to boost our ability to think. Adderall, Provigil, and extra-cortical technologies."

Back in 2008, 20 percent of scientists reported using brain-enhancing drugs. And I spoke with dozens of readers who had complex regimens, including, for example, a researcher at the MIT-affiliated Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. “We aren’t the teen clubbers popping uppers to get through a hard day running a cash register after binge drinking,” the researcher told me. “We are responsible humans.” Responsible humans trying to get an edge in incredibly competitive and cognitively demanding fields.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]



Apr 26

"Adapt or die."

Hanna (2011)

(via suicideblonde)